Nan Lawson

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Nan02Nan Lawson’s City of Heart can be found in the Land of Nod’s Nod Institute of Art.

By Anna Passadori

Anna develops and designs exclusive product for The Land of Nod. She hails from the west coast and has traveled the world to source product. She loves anything Marc Jacobs, Sofia Coppola or stripes! (So, if anyone can get a photo of Sofia Coppola wearing a striped outfit by Marc Jacobs, please send it along.)

The Taste of Springtime – Making Jelly from Violets

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The excitement began last week when the girls' class picked violets to make jelly. And today the jelly was ready. The best part? Everyone got a little jar to bring home.

Violet Jelly

(makes 4 or 5 half-pint jars)

2 heaping cups of fresh violets- no stems

2 cups boiling water

1/4 c. well-strained, clear lemon juice

4 cups sugar

3 ounces liquid pectin (Certo)

(optional: 1/2 tsp. rosewater)

1. wash violets, drain and place in heat-proof glass/non-reactive bowl. Pour boiling water over violets and steep for 2 hours. Strain through a fine sieve, reserving the clear, purple infusion.

2. place jars & lids in stock pot deep enough to cover by 2". Bring water to a boil, then reduce to simmer & keep hot till ready to fill.

3. to make the jelly: stir lemon juice & sugar into reserved infusion in a 2 qt. pan. Bring to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down. Add the liquid pectin and continue to boil for 2 minutes, skimming any foam that may rise to the surface.

4. ladle quickly into jars to within 1/8" from the top. Clean rim & threads and place tops before filling the next jar. Screw bands tightly & invert jars on tea towel for 5-10 minutes. Jars should seal and pop shut within 10 minutes, as they cool. Sealed jars will last for up to 1 year in cool, dark storage. Open jars will keep for 3 weeks in refrigerator.

Thank you, Brydget, for the recipe.

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The taste of spring indeed.

Post by Helen Bird : www.curlybirds.typepad.com

Mini Flower Pots

Here is a project to make some flowers that should be able to stand up to anything – frost included!  I found these little wooden pots on clearance, and my design assistant was so excited to paint them for our daily "project."  (We try to do a project every day – she's a pretty strict task master – won't let me slide even when I'm tired from work!)

I painted the sticks – it seemed a little scary to hand a 4-year-old pointy wooden skewers and a paint brush.  I am very proud of the drying method I came up – old Play-doh?  Give it one last hurrah as a place to keep the sticks upright while drying! 

My pots got painted first – I didn't put quite as much creative energy (or as many coats of paint) into them as my design assistant.

To attach the "stems" to the pots, I put a blob of hot glue around the base and then put it into the pot (mine came with holes in them – perfect!).  Stick it into the pot pretty quickly and then hold it straight for a few seconds while the glue firms up. And look – the glue doesn't come out the bottom – it's like a miracle!

Since I had some time to kill while I waited for the diva to be done painting, I added some crackle finish to my pots . . . think it's hard – it's not – I show you how cheap and easy it is here.  And then, repurpose that play dough again and stand the pots up til they dry.  Now the bottoms are all pretty and painted, too!

Ah, she's finally done – and SO proud of herself.  I love how much she loves to get crafty with me.  It's fun, it keeps us both happier while I'm doing stuff, and I think she probably is learning important skills that she'll use someday – maybe in a toy factory . . . just kidding!

For some reason, I stopped taking pictures after this step.  This is very unusual for me…and I apologize.  Anyway, it's not too hard to explain without visual aids – I took two felt shapes, put a bit of hot glue between them, and carefully placed the "stem" skewers in the center. Then, we added a yarn bow or more felt shapes for "leaves." Finally, we took that worn out play dough and stuck a little in the pots, then topped it with glue and rainbow rice.  

My design assistant immediately took hers and put them in the dollhouse – so they didn't make the final picture.  Too bad, because we added some extra rhinestone bling to them! She also took two of them in to give to her teachers – she really loves giving people her art. I think she thinks that's what I'm doing when I ship out orders from my shop . . . ah well, still a good lesson.

Set them around the house (or the dollhouse) to brighten up these last few days of winter!

 

Post by Cameron : Homemade by Cameron

Nautical Kids Room, 3 Ways

We’re loving nautical rooms, because they never go out of style! There are so many different ways to incorporate this style into a room. Here are a few:

Room 1: Sailor Pop
For a bright and whimsical look, try these fun pops of blue & red!

Nautical_1

Clockwise from Top Right: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Room 2: Pirate Cove
For an older child, try mixing in grey, navy or black and patterns like wood grain, stripes and zig zag.

Nautical_2

Clockwise from Top Right: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Room 3: Easy Sailing
Bright green adds a soft feel, and makes it a great option for girls, too!

Nautical_3

Clockwise from Top Right: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

 

By Anna Passadori
Anna develops and designs exclusive product for The Land of Nod. She hails from the west coast and has traveled the world to source product. She loves anything Marc Jacobs, Sofia Coppola or stripes! (So, if anyone can get a photo of Sofia Coppola wearing a striped outfit by Marc Jacobs, please send it along.)