Guggenheim – Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 144 in Queens

Written by Rachel, Nod’s PR & Social Media Lead

Today’s post is a continuation of a series on The Land of Nod’s sponsorship of the Guggenheim’s A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Each Tuesday in June we highlighted of the school’s projects. Today’s spotlight is on PS 144 in Queens.

Third graders at PS 144 were inspired by architects Frank Gehry and Frank Lloyd Wright as they came up with models of their ideal classroom. The student artists considered shape, line, and form while exploring innovative ideas for redesigning a classroom space through sculpture. As young product and interior designers, they experimented with multiple possibilities by building prototypes. Students explored options for the shape of a classroom by creating small paper sculptures before they built their 3-D classroom models from wire, plastic, paper, foam, metal, and found objects.

Guggenheim – Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 144 in Queens

LTA students in the classroom
Third grade, PS 144, Queens, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim – Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 144 in Queens

Student Artwork
Third grade, PS 144, Queens, 2015
Photo: Kris McKay © 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Molly O’Brien, Teaching Artist for PS 144, believes that, “The greatest lessons can be learned using art: expression, acceptance, confidence, innovation, teamwork, critical thinking. I look at my role as a teaching artist as an opportunity for the students and me to collaborate as artists. Students are constantly surprising me with their brilliance. I encourage them to question the world around them, and in return their questions inspire my own practice.”

This spring, we were honored to be one of the sponsors of  A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. This program has been serving New York City public school students for more than forty years. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Guggenheim – Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the Bronx

Written by Rachel, Nod’s PR & Social Media Lead

Today’s post is a continuation of a series on The Land of Nod’s sponsorship of the Guggenheim’s A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Each Tuesday in June we’re highlighting one of the school’s projects.  Today’s spotlight is on PS 86 in the Bronx.

Sixth graders at PS 86 explored drawing techniques and created self-portraits on iPad sketchbooks.  Using technology allowed students to explore the differences between digital and analog drawing. The student artists then created portrait monoprints, allowing them to tackle different media and materials inspired by the same subject… themselves!

Guggenheim - Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the Bronx

LTA students in the classroom
Sixth grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim - Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the Bronx

LTA students in the classroom
Sixth grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim - Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the BronxStudent Artwork
Sixth grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Teaching Artist Jeff Hopkins says that “art is about sharing stories and connecting with others. Students learn to ask: What stories do I have to share? What stories do others have that might connect to my own experiences? The language of visual art is a communication tool as essential as speaking or writing. When students learn to think visually, they learn a new way to connect with the world around them.”

This spring, we were honored to be one of the sponsors of  A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. This program has been serving New York City public school students for more than forty years. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

 

Nod Printable Coloring Page – Happy 4th of July

Nod Fun Pages designed by Michelle Romo

We can’t believe that the 4th of July is almost here! We’re looking forward to fireworks, hot dogs and a summery day with our families. Download this free Fourth of July themed printable coloring page HERE. Share a pic of your little one with the finished product on Instagram (use hashtag #landofnod) or our Facebook page. We may feature it!
Nod Printable Coloring Page - Happy 4th of July

Michelle Romo is our newest Nod illustrator, she’s a self-taught illustrator and designer fueled by cookies and naps. Her influences include Mid-Century, Japanese and Scandinavian design, along with pretty much anything cute. When she isn’t working she spends her time eating good food, hugging her friends, playing video games and crafting.

Guggenheim Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 48 in Staten Island

Written by Rachel, Nod’s PR & Social Media Lead

Today’s post is a continuation of a series on The Land of Nod’s sponsorship of the Guggenheim’s A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Each Tuesday in June we’re highlighting one of the school’s projects.  Today’s spotlight is on PS 48 in Staten Island.

Throughout the year, fourth grade student artists learned about kinetic energy and discovered ways to make moving sculptures. Combining 3-D design principles (balance, texture, form, and space) with scientific concepts (mechanical, gravitational, electrical, and magnetic energies), students created diagrams and step-by-step instructions for their sculptures.

The residency culminated by building automatas, handmade toys powered by a simple mechanism. Student artists confronted their essential question “What moves us?” on a more personal level when they utilized both their artistic and scientific knowledge to develop unique ways to make their sculptures move.

Guggenheim Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 48 in Staten Island

LTA students in the classroom

Fourth grade, PS 48, Staten Island, 2015

© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 48 in Staten Island

Kris McKay © 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim

 

Rose Nestler, Teaching Artist said that, “visual thinking brings out the inherent genius in students, whether they are looking closely at a work of art, drawing from observation, or building a sculpture. As a teaching artist I enable students to envision limitless possibilities in art making; this process opens new channels for students, where they feel empowered to transport their artistic brilliance, imagination, and problem-solving abilities into all aspects of their lives.”

This spring, we were honored to be one of the sponsors of  A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. This program has been serving New York City public school students for more than forty years. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.