Guggenheim – Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the Bronx

Written by Rachel, Nod’s PR & Social Media Lead

Today’s post is a continuation of a series on The Land of Nod’s sponsorship of the Guggenheim’s A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Each Tuesday in June we’re highlighting one of the school’s projects.  Today’s spotlight is on PS 86 in the Bronx.

Sixth graders at PS 86 explored drawing techniques and created self-portraits on iPad sketchbooks.  Using technology allowed students to explore the differences between digital and analog drawing. The student artists then created portrait monoprints, allowing them to tackle different media and materials inspired by the same subject… themselves!

Guggenheim - Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the Bronx

LTA students in the classroom
Sixth grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim - Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the Bronx

LTA students in the classroom
Sixth grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim - Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 86 in the BronxStudent Artwork
Sixth grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2015
© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Teaching Artist Jeff Hopkins says that “art is about sharing stories and connecting with others. Students learn to ask: What stories do I have to share? What stories do others have that might connect to my own experiences? The language of visual art is a communication tool as essential as speaking or writing. When students learn to think visually, they learn a new way to connect with the world around them.”

This spring, we were honored to be one of the sponsors of  A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. This program has been serving New York City public school students for more than forty years. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

 

Guggenheim Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 48 in Staten Island

Written by Rachel, Nod’s PR & Social Media Lead

Today’s post is a continuation of a series on The Land of Nod’s sponsorship of the Guggenheim’s A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Each Tuesday in June we’re highlighting one of the school’s projects.  Today’s spotlight is on PS 48 in Staten Island.

Throughout the year, fourth grade student artists learned about kinetic energy and discovered ways to make moving sculptures. Combining 3-D design principles (balance, texture, form, and space) with scientific concepts (mechanical, gravitational, electrical, and magnetic energies), students created diagrams and step-by-step instructions for their sculptures.

The residency culminated by building automatas, handmade toys powered by a simple mechanism. Student artists confronted their essential question “What moves us?” on a more personal level when they utilized both their artistic and scientific knowledge to develop unique ways to make their sculptures move.

Guggenheim Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 48 in Staten Island

LTA students in the classroom

Fourth grade, PS 48, Staten Island, 2015

© 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

Guggenheim Learning Through Art – Spotlight on PS 48 in Staten Island

Kris McKay © 2015 Solomon R. Guggenheim

 

Rose Nestler, Teaching Artist said that, “visual thinking brings out the inherent genius in students, whether they are looking closely at a work of art, drawing from observation, or building a sculpture. As a teaching artist I enable students to envision limitless possibilities in art making; this process opens new channels for students, where they feel empowered to transport their artistic brilliance, imagination, and problem-solving abilities into all aspects of their lives.”

This spring, we were honored to be one of the sponsors of  A Year with Children 2015, which features art created by the Guggenheim’s artist-in-residence program, Learning Through Art. This program has been serving New York City public school students for more than forty years. Learning Through Art teaching artists partner with classroom teachers in each of the city’s five boroughs to design collaborative projects that explore art and ideas related to the classroom curriculum.

Introducing Studio Nod

Post by Michelle Kohanzo, Managing Director of The Land of Nod

It has always been at the heart of the Nod brand to collaborate with and celebrate artists and makers.  Without this amazingly talented community our brand would not be whole and so it was quite organically that Studio Nod came to be.  Introducing Studio Nod - One of a Kind Art by Nod Artists

Often times, Nod will commission art, to be translated into product.  For example, an abstract Oil Landscape from Emily Jeffords, destined to become a gorgeous crib quilt, (coming soon).Introducing Studio Nod - One of a Kind Art by Nod Artists

I started to wonder where all of this beautiful art was going, once the product it inspired had come to life.  The answer was, storage.  The thought of this was heartbreaking; there is nothing more beautiful and personal then these pieces our artists were making with their own two hands, gorgeous one of a kind items and we were not sharing them.  Not because we didn’t care, but because there was no avenue to get these things into the world.  And so, this is how Studio Nod was born.  The idea of sharing these inspiring, one of a kind pieces from our most lovely family of artists with all of you.

Introducing Studio Nod - One of a Kind Art by Nod Artists

Studio Nod is a many faceted idea, with one overarching goal – to celebrate the creativity, beauty and talent of our family of artists.  So what is it – Studio Nod is both an Online and Physical gallery space where you can purchase these one of a kind pieces.  If you happen to be in Chicago, we would be delighted to take you through the studio space and share with you the stories of the pieces and their makers.  If you are anywhere else, just shoot us a note – we would love to tell you everything about all of the work.  Because the purpose of Studio Nod is to celebrate our artist family, we have decided that all profit from Studio Nod sales will be returned to our artists in the form of a fund awarded to an artist to further studies, or fund a project, (more details to come).  The Studio Nod space will also be utilized as a residency space for Nod artists to come and collaborate with our designers, have workshops with all of you, and maybe even a party or two.

Introducing Studio Nod - One of a Kind Art by Nod Artists

The art from the studio will be changing all the time, so check back often.  And if you fall in love with a piece, remember there is only one!  I am excited to see this idea to grow and evolve over time and I hope that you all find the work as inspiring as I do.

 

XO,

Michelle

Aside from being the Managing Director of The Land of Nod, mother to four kids (yes I said FOUR!) and a gourmet cook, Michelle is a retail junky. From Zara to Marc Jacobs, Target to Nordstroms, she doesn’t discriminate, there’s room in her heart and closet for them all. And the addiction doesn’t stop at fashion, she’s painted her dining room at least 5 times, and changes rugs like most women change their sheets. Retail isn’t therapy for Michelle, it’s more like oxygen.

The Jealous Curator – Nod Artist Interview

The Jealous Curator - Nod Artist InterviewTell us a bit about yourself…

Let’s see – I’m Danielle Krysa and I have a BFA in Visual Arts, I’m a graphic designer, an art blogger, an author, and a mom to my sweet son, Charlie. Two years ago we moved back to my tiny hometown and settled into a 100 year old farmhouse on the side of a mountain overlooking a lake. It feels like our very own little slice of heaven. I do enjoy a hit of big city every now again mind you, so I always try to have a few book or curating projects going in places like LA and New York.

HOMETOWN: Summerland, Canada

CURRENT TOWN: After years in Toronto and Vancouver, I’ve just moved back to Summerland!

FAVE ICE CREAM FLAVOR: Anything involving brownie chunks

FAVE BREAKFAST FOOD: Hashbrowns – extra crunchy

FAVE HOLIDAY: My birthday. Yes, I’ve officially made that a holiday.

FAVE COLOR: Tie between neon coral & light aqua

FAVE MOVIE: Dirty Dancing (I totally just dated myself)

FAVE DECADE: 80s (I did it again)

The Jealous Curator - Nod Artist Interview 1How did you begin curating art?

I made up fake shows! In the first year of my blog (2009), I used to curate/post my “dream shows” – collections of work that I would love to hang if I had a white-walled gallery at my disposal. It’s so crazy that less than two years after that, galleries started asking me do it for real.

Is there a story behind the name of your company?

Yes – I started “The Jealous Curator” for me, with no plans of ever having readers or a community. It was more like a form of self-prescribed art therapy. I was so overwhelmed, and depressed quite frankly, by the huge amount of amazing art that I was finding online. I was truly jealous of these artists and their work. It was eating me alive, and I was exhausted. So I decided to own it, and say it out loud as “The Jealous Curator”, because that’s what I was – a jealous curator. By sharing artists’ work that I loved, that toxic soul-crushing jealousy turned slowly, but miraculously, into admiration. It was a life changer. I’m no longer jealous – just excited and inspired – but my business cards are already printed, so the name ain’t changing!

What are the most rewarding and the most difficult parts of running your own business? 

The most rewarding part is knowing that I’m in charge of my own success. The most difficult part is knowing that I’m in charge of my own success. Yep, it’s a wonderful sense of freedom, mixed with a dash of nail-biting fear. But, I think I’ve finally arrived at a place in my life where I don’t worry as much as I used to. At the root of it all, I know that I’ll land on my feet as long as I don’t give up.

How would you describe your style?

Hm. Eclectic? I love a lot of different kinds of art, but I suppose there are a few themes that emerge: I love work with a clean/design feel, work that seamlessly blends fine art and craft, and work that looks like the artist might have a touch of OCD! Oh, and portraits. I’m crazy for portraits.

If you could travel anywhere, where would it be?

I went to Bali a few years ago, and I’d go back in a heartbeat. And Paris, anytime.

If you could possess a superpower, what would it be?

An all powerful healing touch. Then I could sleep at night instead of worrying about my little boy.

The Jealous Curator - Nod Artist Interview 2Tell us about your new curated collection with the Land of Nod. 

I’m really proud of this collection! I chose these artists and their works as a curator, but I also had my “mom” hat firmly on. When my son was a baby, I had a really hard time finding cool art for his room – art that he would like, but also something that I wanted to look at while rocking him in the middle of the night, and during diaper changes, and when we were lying on the floor pretending to be [insert any farm animal here].  That’s what this collection is all about. I chose fun, fresh, candy-hued pieces that are perfect for the nursery/kids’ room, but that are contemporary enough to transition smoothly into the “grown-up” areas of a home as your babies grow up (why do they have to grow up!?)

How would you style it in a room?

I chose pieces that work well together, and also purposely made them different sizes… this is a recipe for a really rich, visually interesting gallery wall! ps. Groupings in odd numbers are usually the most successful.

Check out The Jealous Curator here.